From:

North of Jewfish Creek

Dear Friend and Subscriber,

      We live in a jam-packed world.

      It reminds me of a guy who, years ago, did a lot of public speaking.  He had a neat gimmick for getting peopleís attention.  He had a huge glass jar on stage with him.  Heíd tell the audience he was going to fill up the jar.  Then he did.  With rocks.  Rocks about half the size, I think, of a womanís fist.  Then, heíd tell the audience the jar was full and could they see that?  When people in the audience said yes, they could see that he would say ďHold on a minute.  The jar isnít really full.Ē

      Then, he would dump gravel into the jar which would settle in the spaces between the rocks.  He would say that now the jar was full.  When the audience agreed heíd say ďNo, the jar is not full yet.Ē

      Then, heíd put sand in the jar.  The sand would settle in spaces between the gravel and the rocks.  Heíd get the audience to agree the jar was full and then, heíd tell them otherwise.

      Then, heíd put water in the jar and allow as how, at last, the jar was indeed full.

      Nowadays, Iím guessing, some hot shot would say the jar was not full.  And then heíd insert a hose into the water and pump oxygen into it until the water was saturated with oxygen and only then would he say the jar was full.

      But wait!  Along comes another guy who shoots sub-atomic particles into the jar and saturates it with sub-atomic debris and then say how the jar is full.

      And along comes a guy with an x-ray machine... to hell with it.  I got lost way back there when the guy poured water into the jar.

      But hey, you wanna see some jam-packing going on in your everyday life?  You do?  I canít imagine why.  But you can see all of this hysterical jam-packing just by turning on your TV.  Watch any show and wait tíil the commercials come on.  You wonít have to wait long.  First, there will be about a dozen of them one right after the other.  No fading to black for a second between commercials- weíre watching one commercial when weíre hit with another with no time to catch our breath.  Then wham!  Another... and another and another, etc.

      And the commercial itself will be superheated and give you no time whatsoever to absorb one image until thereís another.  I think the average 10 second commercial bombards you with about 50 to 60 images.  One cut after another.  1/100 of a second image then cut!  Ĺ second image cut... 1/3 of a second image cut!  Then image cut!  Image cut, image cut!... Cut!... Cut!... Cut!...

      The sales message?  It doesnít survive all those cuts.  Your mind will be chopped up with all those cuts and, if someone asks you what you just watched youíll sit there numb and mutter, ďI donít know really.  I think it was something about a car?

      Iíd like to see a car commercial where the only image you saw was that of a new car.  It would stay on screen for the full 10 seconds and there would be a voiceover from a celebrity spokesperson that said, ďThis is the new Sharpmobile.  Itís really a great car.  You should buy one.Ē  And this commercial would give maybe a full 6 seconds of relief from the continuing blitz.

      6 seconds!  Wow!  A whole 6 seconds of calm.

      Come to think of it, you know what I didnít write so far  when I described that blitz of commercials?  I didnít write about the sound tracks that accompany all of those commercials.  Itís extremely loud, harsh and grating, violent drums, staccato rythmns, screeching horns, explosions.  Yes, your ears have to be tormented along with your visual cortex.

      Now letís talk about the average Americansí jam-packed life.  He gets up, turns the radio on so he can hear it while he showers.  After the shower, he fires up his trusty I-Pod, puts on a pair of headphones and listens to hip-hop or some kind of heavy metal music.  Then, itís off to his computer to check his e-mails.  While the computer plays music through itís little speakers, then he gets in his car and turns the key to start the car and immediately the car radio is blaring.  He arrives at work, turns off the car and turns on the I-Pod so there will be no dead air as he walks across the parking lot from his car to his office.  He walks in the office and is immediately given a list of phone calls that are waiting for him.  As he walks a short distance to his desk, he can hear seven different radios with seven different stations.  And then he sits down and... never mind.  You can guess what the rest of his day will be like.

      Where I live, there are the sounds of twenty-four hour a day construction work as they endeavor to surround my building with other new buildings.  The cacophony never stops.  I was reminded of all of this as I listened to the CD recordings of my Root Canal Seminar in Los Angeles.  Most of the seminar was taken up by people asking me questions.  They literally sucked me dry.  I am not sure I know anything about marketing that I didnít reveal at that seminar.  And I revealed a lot of information and inside secrets that I didnít know I knew.  It was only through the act of teaching to a lot of information starved attendees that I was able to dredge up secrets and techniques I had forgotten.  It was jam-packing in reverse.  Now it was me who bombarded the attendees with information, marketing secrets, sophisticated techniques of marketing I had long forgotten.  There is a moral here.  A lesson.  And that lesson is if you really want to learn something, you need to teach it.  It is the act of teaching that allows your knowledge of a subject to fully blossom.  Your knowledge of a subject will become better organized and you will discover you know a lot more than you thought you knew.  So thatís the lesson of this newsletter.  If you want to more fully understand something, teach what you already know to one or more people, I can sum up this lesson in three words...

 To Learn...TEACH!

      And listen: I havenít written the detailed sales message that the recordings of my Root Canal Seminar deserves.  In truth, there is so much information on those CD recordings I almost donít know where to start.  Perhaps Iíll get around to that sometime in the future.  But please take my word for it.  If you want to hear me at my best, while I am being sucked-dry of every marketing secret I know, you need to get these CDís.  Iím gonna turn it over to Liliana now, who will tell you how to order them.

 

  Sincerely,
 
 

Gary C. Halbert

 

 

 

P.S. This is Liliana writing now and I am going to tell you how to order the CDís of Garyís Root Canal Seminar.

The price for these invaluable full set of 12 CDís plus an additional Bonus CD with Merchant Account Services Secrets(thatís a total of 13 CDís)is only $397.00 Itís easy to order.  Here are your options:

     1) If you want to use PayPal:         

      a) Go to www.PayPal.com

b) Click the "Send Money" tab

c) The email address you want to send money to is "Gary@TheGaryHalbertLetter.com"

d) The amount to send is $397.00

e) In the "Subject" section put "Los Angeles Seminar CD Set"

f) In the "Shipping Information" section, please put your name, address, phone numbers, and email address.

g) Finally, send an email to roxanne@TheGaryHalbertLetter.com and let her know you've made the PayPal payment

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

2) If you want to pay with a credit card but not use PayPal:

Fax Liliana at 786-924-1694 with your credit card details:

a) Your name exactly as it appears on your credit card

b) Credit card number (we can accept Visa, MasterCard and American Express)

c) Credit card expiration date

d) Security code (Visa and MasterCard has 3-digits on the back of the card in the signature panel); (American Express has 4-digits on the front of the card above the credit card number)

e) The BILLING address of your credit card (the address you receive the bills)

f) Finally, please put your name, address, phone numbers, and email address.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

3) If you want to pay by check or money order:

Mail your check or money order made payable to "Cherrywood Publishing" in the amount of $397.00 to:

NoMax Publishing Inc.
7510 Sunset Blvd. #1020
Los Angeles, CA 90046  USA
(phone: 323-851-8275)

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